• Ever'man Team

Thanksgiving is the biggest food holiday of the year! For most people, prepping for this seasonal feast comes with some serious planning, prepping and delegating. We’ve round up some of our favorite Thanksgiving resources for you as you plan your meal.

MAKE A PLAN.

How much food will you need? As you start to plan your menu, use this handy guide to figure out how much food to prepare. The measurements are in groups of ten--so use your judgement and don’t forget about the joy of leftovers!

BIRD’S THE WORD.

You don’t have to give up your food values and preferences on Thanksgiving. There are many wonderful options for sourcing a turkey that’s right for your meal, just consult this post for all things turkey and strut your new found turkey confidence at the co-op.

WORK THAT TURKEY.

So you found the right bird, yay! Now what? For most of us, it’s not often that we find ourselves preparing a whole turkey. Brush up on your turkey tricks and techniques with this helpful article.

(Not up for the challenge of cooking your own turkey? Call the Ever’man Cafe at 850-438-0402 to reserve your fully cooked 10-12 lbs turkey for $39.99!)

SPICE THINGS UP.

Sure, everyone loves a holiday tradition, but when was the last time your loved ones were delighted with a new flavor or tried a healthy twist on a favorite dish? This article has great ideas to help create new traditions at your table.

ENCOURAGE ECO-CONSCIOUSNESS.

Keep it green this season with a few easy swaps that the Earth will thank you for! Set the tone as host or volunteer to contribute eco-friendly elements to the gatherings you attend. A great way to infuse a little mindfulness into your memory making.

STOCK UP TO SAVE.

Whether you’re an eager over-planner or an infamous procrastinator, don’t forget to let the deals guide you! Our team works hard to bring you seasonal deals that make it easy to save on what you’ll need to make a great meal.

STRESS LESS.

As if the holiday season wasn’t busy enough, adding a huge menu and entertaining company can put anyone into a panic. Make it easy on yourself and check out Stress Less Meals from the Ever’man Cafe. Swing by the store to grab bar supplies and sweet treats, then leave the rest to us!

  • Ever'man Team

Few vegetables capture the feeling and flavor of a season as robustly as the hard-skinned, or winter, squash varieties. Whether in soups or pies or starring in their own recipes, squash bring along the excitement of a new season and fresh flavor in the kitchen. But cooking with squash can seem tricky for the uninitiated, so we've created this handy guide!

What's the difference between summer squash and winter squash?

Harvested in late summer or early fall, these vine-dwellers are then “cured” or “hardened off” in open air to toughen their exterior. This process ensures the squash will keep for months without refrigeration. Squash that has been hurried through this step and improperly cured will appear shiny and may be tender enough to be pierced by your fingernail.

When selecting any variety of winter squash, the stem is the best indication of ripeness. Stems should be tan, dry, and on some varieties, look fibrous and frayed, or corky. Fresh green stems and those leaking sap signal that the squash was harvested before it was ready. Ripe squash should have vivid, saturated (deep) color and a matte, rather than glossy, finish.

Want to learn more about the squash available at Ever’man this season? Take a look at this list then come pick a few to try for your fall and winter recipes!

Winter Squash Recipe Guide

Acorn

This forest green, deeply ribbed squash resembles its namesake, the acorn. It has yellow-orange flesh and a tender-firm texture that holds up when cooked. Acorn’s mild flavor is versatile, making it a traditional choice for stuffing and baking. The hard rind is not good for eating, but helps the squash hold its shape when baked.

  • Selection: Acorn squash should be uniformly green and matte—streaks/spots of orange are fine, but too much orange indicates over ripeness and the squash will be dry and stringy.

  • Best uses: baking, stuffing, mashing.

  • Other varieties: all-white “Cream of the Crop,” and all-yellow “Golden Acorn.”

Butternut

These squash are named for their peanut-like shape and smooth, beige coloring. Butternut is a good choice for recipes calling for a large amount of squash because they are dense—the seed cavity is in the small bulb opposite the stem end, so the large stem is solid squash. Their vivid orange flesh is sweet and slightly nutty with a smooth texture that falls apart as it cooks. Although the rind is edible, butternut is usually peeled before use.

  • Selection: Choose the amount of squash needed by weight. One pound of butternut equals approximately 2 cups of peeled, chopped squash.

  • Best uses: soups, purees, pies, recipes where smooth texture and sweetness will be highlighted

Delicata

This oblong squash is butter yellow in color with green mottled striping in shallow ridges. Delicata has a thin, edible skin that is easy to work with but makes it a poor squash for long-term storage; this is why you’ll only find them in the fall. The rich, sweet yellow flesh is flavorful and tastes like chestnuts, corn, and sweet potatoes.

  • Selection: Because they are more susceptible to breakdown than other winter squash, take care to select squash without scratches or blemishes, or they may spoil quickly.

  • Best Uses: Delicata’s walls are thin, making it a quick-cooking squash. It can be sliced in 1/4-inch rings and sautéed until soft and caramelized (remove seeds first), halved and baked in 30 minutes, or broiled with olive oil or butter until caramelized.

  • Other varieties: Sugar Loaf and Honey Boat are varieties of Delicata that have been crossed with Butternut. They are often extremely sweet with notes of caramel, hazelnut, and brown sugar (They're delicious and fleeting, so we recommend buying them when you find them!).

Heart of Gold/Festival/Carnival

These colorful, festive varieties of squash are all hybrids resulting from a cross between Sweet Dumpling and Acorn, and are somewhere between the two in size. Yellow or cream with green and orange mottling, these three can be difficult to tell apart, but for culinary purposes, they are essentially interchangeable. With a sweet nutty flavor like Dumpling, and a tender-firm texture like Acorn, they are the best of both parent varieties.

  • Selection: Choose brightly colored squash that are heavy for their size.

  • Best uses: baking, stuffing, broiling with brown sugar.

Pie Pumpkin

Pie pumpkins differ from larger carving pumpkins in that they have been bred for sweetness and not for size. They are uniformly orange and round with an inedible rind, and are sold alongside other varieties of winter squash (unlike carving pumpkins which are usually displayed separately from winter squash). These squash are mildly sweet and have a rich pumpkin flavor that is perfect for pies and baked goods. They make a beautiful centerpiece when hollowed out and filled with pumpkin soup.

  • Selection: Choose a pie pumpkin that has no hint of green and still has a stem attached; older pumpkins may lose their stems.

  • Best uses: pies, custards, baked goods, curries and stews.

Red Kuri

These vivid orange, beta carotene-saturated squash are shaped like an onion, or teardrop. They have a delicious chestnut-like flavor, and are mildly sweet with a dense texture that holds shape when steamed or cubed, but smooth and velvety when pureed, making them quite versatile.

  • Selection: Select a smooth, uniformly colored squash with no hint of green.

  • Best Uses: Thai curries, soups, pilafs and gratins, baked goods.

  • Other varieties: Hokkaido, Japanese Uchiki.

Spaghetti

These football-sized, bright yellow squash are very different from other varieties in this family. Spaghetti squash has a pale golden interior, and is stringy and dense—in a good way! After sliced in half and baked, use a fork to pry up the strands of flesh and you will see it resembles and has the texture of perfectly cooked spaghetti noodles. These squash are not particularly sweet but have a mild flavor that takes to a wide variety of preparations.

  • Selection: choose a bright yellow squash that is free of blemishes and soft spots.

  • Best uses: baked and separated, then mixed with pesto, tomato sauce, or your favorite pasta topping.

Sweet Dumpling

These small, four- to-six-inch round squash are cream-colored with green mottled streaks and deep ribs similar to Acorn. Pale gold on the inside, with a dry, starchy flesh similar to a potato, these squash are renowned for their rich, honey-sweet flavor.

  • Selection: pick a smooth, blemish-free squash that is heavy for its size and is evenly colored. Avoid a squash that has a pale green tint as it is underripe.

  • Best uses: baking with butter and cinnamon.

Adapted from “Winter Squash Guide,” shared by permission from StrongerTogether.coop. Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.