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  • California Asparagus Comm

Crucial Benefits For Your Loved Ones & You

Updated: Jan 11, 2019

Discover the power of California asparagus as the lean green nutrient machine that it is. This superfood will strengthen and restore you to where you want to be. Better yet? It's all based on science.

Can Help Reduce Health Risks

Asparagus is a good source of antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, flavonoids and polyphenols. Antioxidants prevent the accumulation of harmful free radicals and may reduce your risk of chronic disease.

Antioxidants are compounds that help protect your cells from the harmful effects of free radicals and oxidative stress.

Oxidative stress contributes to aging, chronic inflammation and many diseases, including cancer.

Asparagus, like other green vegetables, is high in antioxidants. These include vitamin E, vitamin C and glutathione, as well as various flavonoids and polyphenols.

Asparagus is particularly high in the flavonoids quercetin, isorhamnetin and kaempferol.

These substances have been found to have blood pressure-lowering, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and anticancer effects in a number of human, test-tube and animal studies.

What’s more, purple asparagus contains powerful pigments called anthocyanins, which give the vegetable its vibrant color and have antioxidant effects in the body.

In fact, increasing anthocyanin intake has been shown to reduce blood pressure and the risk of heart attacks and heart disease.

Eating asparagus along with other fruits and vegetables can provide your body with a range of antioxidants to promote good health.



Improves Digestive Health

As a good source of fiber, asparagus promotes regularity and digestive health and may help reduce your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Dietary fiber is essential for good digestive health.

Just half a cup of asparagus contains 1.8 grams of fiber, which is 7% of your daily needs.

Studies suggest that a diet high in fiber-rich fruits and vegetables may help reduce the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes.

Asparagus is particularly high in insoluble fiber, which adds bulk to stool and supports regular bowel movements.

It also contains a small amount of soluble fiber, which dissolves in water and forms a gel-like substance in the digestive tract.

Soluble fiber feeds the friendly bacteria in the gut, such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus.

Increasing the number of these beneficial bacteria plays a role in strengthening the immune system and producing essential nutrients like vitamins B12 and K2.

Eating asparagus as part of a fiber-rich diet is an excellent way to help meet your fiber needs and keep your digestive system healthy.




Helps Support A Healthy Pregnancy

Asparagus is high in folate (vitamin B9), an important nutrient that helps reduce the risk of neural tube defects during pregnancy.

Asparagus is an excellent source of folate, also known as vitamin B9.

Just half a cup of asparagus provides adults with 34% of their daily folate needs and pregnant women with 22% of their daily needs.

Folate is an essential nutrient that helps form red blood cells and produce DNA for healthy growth and development. It’s especially important during the early stages of pregnancy to ensure the healthy development of the baby.

Getting enough folate from sources like asparagus, green leafy vegetables and fruit can protect against neural tube defects, including spina bifida.

Neural tube defects can lead to a range of complications, ranging from learning difficulties to lack of bowel and bladder control to physical disabilities.

In fact, adequate folate is so vital during pre-pregnancy and early pregnancy that folate supplements are recommended to ensure women meet their requirements.

Helps Lower Blood Pressure

Asparagus contains potassium, a mineral that can help lower high blood pressure. In addition, animal research has found that asparagus may contain an active compound that dilates blood vessels, thus lowering blood pressure.

High blood pressure affects more than 1.3 billion people worldwide and is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

Research suggests that increasing potassium intake while reducing salt intake is an effective way to lower high blood pressure.

Potassium lowers blood pressure in two ways: by relaxing the walls of blood vessels and excreting excess salt through urine.

Asparagus is a good source of potassium, providing 6% of your daily requirement in a half-cup serving.

What’s more, research in rats with high blood pressure suggests that asparagus may have other blood pressure-lowering properties. In one study, rats were fed either a diet with 5% asparagus or a standard diet without asparagus.

After 10 weeks, the rats on the asparagus diet had 17% lower blood pressure than the rats on the standard diet.

Researchers believed this effect was due to an active compound in asparagus that causes blood vessels to dilate.

However, human studies are needed to determine whether this active compound has the same effect in humans.

In any case, eating more potassium-rich vegetables, such as asparagus, is a great way to help keep your blood pressure in a healthy range.




Can Help You Lose Weight

Asparagus has a number of features that make it a weight-loss friendly food. It’s low in calories, high in water and rich in fiber.

Currently, no studies have tested the effects of asparagus on weight loss.

However, it has a number of properties that could potentially help you lose weight.

First, it’s very low in calories, with only 20 calories in half a cup. This means you can eat a lot of asparagus without taking in a lot of calories.

Furthermore, it’s about 94% water. Research suggests that consuming low-calorie, water-rich foods is associated with weight loss.

Asparagus is also rich in fiber, which has been linked to lower body weight and weight loss.


It Boosts Your Mood

Researchers have found a connection between low levels of folate and vitamin B12 in people who are suffering from depression, leading some docs to prescribe daily doses of both vitamins (found heavily in asparagus) to patients with depression.

Asparagus is full of folate, a B vitamin that could lift your spirits and help ward off irritability. Researchers have found a connection between low levels of folate and vitamin B12 in people who are suffering from depression, leading some docs to prescribe daily doses of both vitamins to patients with depression. Asparagus also contains high levels of tryptophan, an amino acid that has been similarly linked to improved mood.







It Beats Bloating

Thanks to prebiotics—carbohydrates that can’t be digested and help encourage a healthy balance of good bacteria, or probiotics, in your digestive track—it can also reduce gas

When it comes to fighting bloat, asparagus packs a mean punch. The veggie helps promote overall digestive health (another benefit of all that soluble and insoluble fiber!). And thanks to prebiotics—carbohydrates that can’t be digested and help encourage a healthy balance of good bacteria, or probiotics, in your digestive track—it can also reduce gas. Plus, as a natural diuretic, asparagus helps flush excess liquid, combating belly bulge.




Easy To Incorporate Into Your Diet

Asparagus is a delicious and versatile vegetable that’s easy to incorporate into your diet. Add it to salads, frittatas, omelets and stir-fries.

In addition to being nutritious, asparagus is delicious and easy to incorporate into your diet.

It can be cooked in a variety of ways, including boiling, grilling, steaming, roasting and sautéing. You can also purchase canned asparagus, which is precooked and ready to eat.

Asparagus can be used in a number of dishes like salads, stir-fries, frittatas, omelets and pastas, and it makes an excellent side dish.

Furthermore, it’s extremely affordable and widely available at most grocery stores.

When shopping for fresh asparagus, look for firm stems and tight, closed tips.



Original articles can be found here and here.